The best NAS drives for 2018

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Moogle Stiltzkin
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The best NAS drives for 2018

Post by Moogle Stiltzkin » Thu May 03, 2018 9:32 pm

personally my own recommendations tend to lean toward more budget cost per tb nas hdds. And 4tb is king :wink:

anyway here is some info posted by others on the topic.

The best NAS drives for 2018
By Mark Pickavance | 25 Apr 2018

What capacity do I need?
The first requirement is capacity. You'll need one that has enough storage to meet your needs now and in the future. Plenty of NAS drives come with no disks at all - these are known as diskless or bare drives. The advantage is that you can choose the drives you want and how much capacity you need.

You can now get disks up to 10TB is size, though for you’ll be paying at least £400 or so for the privilege. 4TB disks are arguably the current sweet spot, at around £120.

https://www.techadvisor.co.uk/test-cent ... 8-3217608/


The Best NAS 3.5″ hard disk drives (HDD) Designed for 24/7 usage, NAS (Network Attached Storage) and RAID.
- last updated Apr 5, 2018


-WD Red drives consume the least power, run the coolest but offers the lowest performance (5400rpm) and offer a 3 years warranty.
-Seagate Ironwolf power consumption and performance varies: 1-4TB: 5,900rpm, 6-10TB: 7,200rpm. 3 years warranty, 1-8 bays
-Toshiba N300 drives consume more power, higher performance (7200rpm), offer a 3 years warranty, up to 8 bays
-Seagate Ironwolf Pro drives consume more power, higher performance (7200rpm), offer a 5 years warranty, up to 16 bays
-HGST NAS drives consume more power, higher performance (7200rpm) and offer a 3 years warranty.
-WD Red Pro drives consume more power, higher performance (7200rpm) and offer a 5 years warranty.


Western Digital Red:
WD Red 1 TB from Amazon, B&H ($69.00) or Newegg ($61.99)
WD Red 2 TB from Amazon, B&H ($83.99) or Newegg ($83.49)
WD Red 3 TB from Amazon, B&H ($109.99) or Newegg ($107.98)
WD Red 4 TB from Amazon, B&H ($125.99) or Newegg ($124.99)
WD Red 6 TB from Amazon, B&H ($204.00) or Newegg ($185.99)
WD Red 8 TB from Amazon, B&H ($306.29) or Newegg ($306.29)
WD Red 10TB from Amazon, B&H ($358.88) or Newegg ($374.99)

Seagate IronWolf:
Seagate IronWolf 1TB from Amazon, B&H ($64.99) or Newegg ($59.99)
Seagate IronWolf 2TB from Amazon, B&H ($89.99) or Newegg ($78.48)
Seagate IronWolf 3TB from Amazon, B&H ($109.99) or Newegg ($97.49)
Seagate IronWolf 4TB from Amazon, B&H ($139.99) or Newegg ($129.99)
Seagate IronWolf 6TB from Amazon, B&H ($214.99) or Newegg ($189.99)
Seagate IronWolf 8TB from Amazon, B&H ($284.99) or Newegg ($241.49)
Seagate Ironwolf 10TB from Amazon, B&H ($379.99) or Newegg ($319.00)
Seagate Ironwolf 12TB from Amazon, B&H ($423.39) or Newegg ($420.89)

Toshiba N300:
Toshiba N300 4TB from Amazon, B&H ($134.99) or Newegg ($120.99)
Toshiba N300 6TB from Amazon, B&H ($204.99) or Newegg ($179.99)
Toshiba N300 8TB from Amazon or Newegg ($238.26)

Seagate IronWolf Pro:
Seagate IronWolf Pro 2TB from Amazon, B&H ($144.99) or Newegg ($129.99)
Seagate IronWolf Pro 4TB from Amazon, B&H ($199.99) or Newegg ($172.99)
Seagate IronWolf Pro 6TB from Amazon, B&H ($269.99) or Newegg ($229.99)
Seagate IronWolf Pro 8TB from Amazon, B&H (N/A) or Newegg ($317.99)
Seagate Ironwolf Pro 10TB from Amazon, B&H ($449.99) or Newegg ($358.99)
Seagate Ironwolf Pro 12TB from Amazon, B&H ($458.23) or Newegg ($458.16)

HGST NAS:
HGST NAS 4TB from Amazon, B&H ($131.95) or Newegg ($133.99)
HGST NAS 6TB from Amazon, B&H ($194.99) or Newegg ($179.99)
HGST NAS 8TB from Amazon, B&H ($249.99) or Newegg ($249.99)
HGST NAS 10TB from Amazon, B&H ($308.00) or Newegg ($315.99)


Western Digital Red Pro:
WD Red Pro 2TB from Amazon or B&H ($119.49) or Newegg ($119.99)
WD Red Pro 4TB from Amazon or B&H ($174.99) or Newegg ($178.99)
WD Red Pro 6TB from Amazon or B&H ($229.99) or Newegg ($232.99)
WD Red Pro 8TB from Amazon or B&H ($306.29) or Newegg ($306.29)
WD Red Pro 10TB from Amazon or B&H ($399.00) or Newegg ($398.49)



*ctrl+f to the sub title of the article to check the price comparisons
https://www.hardware-revolution.com/bes ... il-2018/#3



personally i don't recommend the toshibas because of their higher power consumption which is bad for a NAS left on 24/7

As much as i like *and even went as far as buying hgst deskstar nas hdds, the 3 year warranty vs 5 years should be considered. If you can get something similarly priced, go for the higher warranty hdd.

i color marked the ones i recommend. get the cheapest one if you are on a budget. the pro series cost a bit more, if your budget is not enough you can go for the non pro hdds.


my suggested configuration is 4 x 4 TB raid5 which gives you a 12tb of usable space. which is about a $500 usd investment using the cheapest budget option *based on the price list above, which gives you guaranteed storage for the next 5 years (obviously no such thing as guaranteed but i meant your HDDS are replaceable under warranty during that time period, unless you opt for 3year warranty hdd :' )
https://www.synology.com/en-us/support/ ... 0TB|4%20TB

i still recommend having a backup for this if you don't already :) a cloud backup service, or a second NAS.



If you have your own suggestions and insights for which NAS hdds to get in 2018, feel free to post here :)


//update

there is a new youtube video that pretty much sums up which nas hdd to get


SPANdotCOM
Published on 14 May 2018


From Youtube.com


https://nascompares.com/guide/differenc ... ormal-hdd/
Last edited by Moogle Stiltzkin on Tue May 15, 2018 1:10 pm, edited 3 times in total.
NAS
[Main Server] QNAP TS-877 w. 4tb [ 3x HGST Deskstar NAS (HDN724040ALE640) & 1x WD RED NAS ] EXT4 Raid5 & 2 x m.2 SATA Samsung 850 Evo raid1 +16gb ddr4 Crucial+ QWA-AC2600 wireless+QXP PCIE
[Backup] QNAP TS-653A w. 5x 2TB Samsung F3 (HD203WI) EXT4 Raid5
[Backup] QNAP TL-D400S 2x 4TB WD Red Nas (WD40EFRX) single disks.
[^] QNAP TS-659 Pro II
[^] QNAP TS-509 Pro w. 4x 1TB WD RE3 (WD1002FBYS) EXT4 Raid5
[^] QNAP TS-228
[^] QNAP TS-128
[Mobile NAS] TBS-453DX w. 2x Crucial MX500 500gb EXT4 raid1

Network
Asus AC68U Router|100dl/50ul MBPS FTTH Internet | Win10, WC PC-Intel i7 920 Ivy bridge desktop (1x 512gb Samsung 850 Pro SSD + 1x 4tb HGST Ultrastar 7K4000)


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Trexx
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Re: The best NAS drives for 2018

Post by Trexx » Thu May 03, 2018 11:31 pm

Be careful on the HGST Deskstar NAS drives and check compatibility lists closer to make sure you are using EXACT model numbers.

Generally the 64MB Cache models are on the compatibility lists, but the newer 128MB cache models aren't in many cases.
Paul

Model: TS-877-1600 FW: 4.4.3.x
QTS (SSD): [RAID-1] 2 x 1TB WD Blue m.2's
Data (HDD): [RAID-5] 6 x 3TB HGST DeskStar
VMs (SSD): [RAID-1] 2 x 500GB Evo 860
Ext. (HDD): TR-004 [Raid-5] 4 x 4TB HGST Ultastor
RAM: Kingston HyperX Fury 64GB DDR4-2666
GPU: EVGA GTX 1060 6GB
UPS: CP AVR1350

Model:TVS-673 32GB FW: 4.4.3.x Test/Backup Box
Model:TS-228a FW: 4.4.3.x Test/Backup Box
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NAS RAID Rebuild Times | Live QTS Videos | | QNAP NAS Guide | Information needed when you ask for HELP | QNAP Links, Tutorials, etc.
2018 Plex NAS Compatibility Guide | QNAP Plex FAQ | Moogle's QNAP Faq

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Re: The best NAS drives for 2018

Post by flymeaway » Fri May 04, 2018 1:40 am

I think what this leaves out, unfortunately, are the solid deals that one can get on slightly-prior-generation Enterprise Datacenter drives, which are a step up from NAS and typically have better / pro-level specs (RPM, cache, MTBF) and longer warranties.

Example: I just bought 6x4TB Enterprise-grade HGST drives (a step up from their NAS line; Ultrastar 7K6000) for $150 each. They are prior-generation, but that's actually a plus as they are on the QNAP official list while the current generation drives aren't. Like most enterprise drives they have a 7200rpm, 128mb cache spec and a five-year warranty (well, closer to 4 years, as these enterprise warranties run from date of manufacture not date of purchase). So I'm getting a comparable if not superior-spec drive to WD or Seagate's PRO line, but at a $25-50 / drive discount.
David

Model: TS-877 R5-1600 // QTS 4.3.4.0551
Disks: 6x4TB HGST HUS726040ALE610 (RAID 6; QNAP approved) // 1x480gb Sandisk X400 SSD (no RAID; not approved)
RAM: 8gb QNAP OEM; 16gb Ballistix Sport DDR4 2400 MHz
GPU: EVGA GTX 1050 SC Gaming
UPS: CyberPower AVR1350
Cloud Backup: TBD

a13antichrist
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Re: The best NAS drives for 2018

Post by a13antichrist » Wed May 09, 2018 5:49 pm

flymeaway wrote:I think what this leaves out, unfortunately, are the solid deals that one can get on slightly-prior-generation Enterprise Datacenter drives, which are a step up from NAS and typically have better / pro-level specs (RPM, cache, MTBF) and longer warranties.

Example: I just bought 6x4TB Enterprise-grade HGST drives (a step up from their NAS line; Ultrastar 7K6000) for $150 each. They are prior-generation, but that's actually a plus as they are on the QNAP official list while the current generation drives aren't. Like most enterprise drives they have a 7200rpm, 128mb cache spec and a five-year warranty (well, closer to 4 years, as these enterprise warranties run from date of manufacture not date of purchase). So I'm getting a comparable if not superior-spec drive to WD or Seagate's PRO line, but at a $25-50 / drive discount.


That's actually a really good suggestion. I'm going to start looking around for places that do these kind of dumps, heh.

BTW, in EU these numbers don't hold; the larger-capacity drives are almost always better-value $/gb than the size below it. 8Tb ends up being the sweet spot.

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Re: The best NAS drives for 2018

Post by Moogle Stiltzkin » Wed May 09, 2018 5:54 pm

well... i bought a HGST 7K4000 for my desktop use. but when compared to the newer HGST enterprise drives, they win out in terms of performance, and lower power consumption. So... there is that too to consider.


for reference
https://www.bit-tech.net/reviews/tech/s ... d-disks/1/
https://www.anandtech.com/show/2888
https://www.seagate.com/as/en/tech-insi ... master-ti/
https://www.experts-exchange.com/questi ... oring.html
https://groups.google.com/a/zfsonlinux. ... oS2zgT2sgk


anyway, there are sites like these which give you a comparison to see what your getting at least
http://hdd.userbenchmark.com/Compare/Hi ... 57vsm29773


and usually on their product pages you can see something like this
Overview:
Increasing Capacity Density by 50%
As petabyte (PB) growth continues to increase at a rapid pace, corporate and cloud data centers are under extreme pressure to improve the efficiency of storage. To address this data center challenge, HGST introduces Ultrastar 7K6000, delivering up to 6TB of capacity in an industrystandard, 3.5-inch hard drive, for capacity-optimized enterprise applications. Ultrastar 7K6000 provides 50% more capacity and 30% better power efficiency in terms of Watts per terabyte (W/TB) than its predecessor, Ultrastar 7K4000. The 7K6000 is designed for all traditional and rapidly growing scale-out storage applications, including object, block and file storage architectures, providing huge capacity, fast 7,200 RPM performance and economical $/TB acquisition cost.

Technology Innovation Improves Storage Efficiency
Ultrastar 7K6000 also delivers greater storage efficiency through high performance, achieving up to 3X higher random write performance, thanks to HGST media cache architecture, a diskbased caching technology, which provides a large non-volatile cache on the disk. Media cache also allows for improved reliability and data integrity during unexpected power loss. Other performance-enhancing features include higher areal density for 25% faster sequential performance vs. 7K4000, and a 128MB cache buffer. Designed to handle workloads up to 550TB per year, Ultrastar 7K6000 offers a 12Gb/s SAS (6Gb/s SATA) interface for easy integration into high performance data centers. As drive capacities increase, so does the time required to recover a failed drive in a RAID configuration. Dramatically reduce RAID rebuild times and maintain system performance during the rebuild process with the new Rebuild Assist. Learn more in our Rebuild Assist technical brief. For legacy systems that require native 512 formatting, models are available at 4TB and 2TB capacity points.

Data Security with Trusted Quality, Reliability
Compliance and privacy requirements drive the need for increased data security. Ultrastar 7K6000 helps protect data from unauthorized use by offering security and encryption options. Instant Secure Erase (ISE) models expedite drive redeployment and retirement. Encryption models protect data with hardware-based encryption, including a Trusted Computing Group (TCG) Enterprise_A, TCG with FIPS 140-2 certification, Level 2. The Ultrastar 7K6000 is a seventh generation, 5-platter design, field proven by top server and storage OEMs, and Internet giants, and extends HGST’s long-standing tradition of reliability leadership with a 2M-hour MTBF rating and a 5-year limited warranty.

https://diskstorageworks.com/Ultrastar-7K6000.asp



flymeaway wrote:I think what this leaves out, unfortunately, are the solid deals that one can get on slightly-prior-generation Enterprise Datacenter drives, which are a step up from NAS and typically have better / pro-level specs (RPM, cache, MTBF) and longer warranties.

Example: I just bought 6x4TB Enterprise-grade HGST drives (a step up from their NAS line; Ultrastar 7K6000) for $150 each. They are prior-generation, but that's actually a plus as they are on the QNAP official list while the current generation drives aren't. Like most enterprise drives they have a 7200rpm, 128mb cache spec and a five-year warranty (well, closer to 4 years, as these enterprise warranties run from date of manufacture not date of purchase). So I'm getting a comparable if not superior-spec drive to WD or Seagate's PRO line, but at a $25-50 / drive discount.


best suggestion so far :) hm... is that ebay?
Last edited by Moogle Stiltzkin on Sat May 12, 2018 2:07 am, edited 4 times in total.
NAS
[Main Server] QNAP TS-877 w. 4tb [ 3x HGST Deskstar NAS (HDN724040ALE640) & 1x WD RED NAS ] EXT4 Raid5 & 2 x m.2 SATA Samsung 850 Evo raid1 +16gb ddr4 Crucial+ QWA-AC2600 wireless+QXP PCIE
[Backup] QNAP TS-653A w. 5x 2TB Samsung F3 (HD203WI) EXT4 Raid5
[Backup] QNAP TL-D400S 2x 4TB WD Red Nas (WD40EFRX) single disks.
[^] QNAP TS-659 Pro II
[^] QNAP TS-509 Pro w. 4x 1TB WD RE3 (WD1002FBYS) EXT4 Raid5
[^] QNAP TS-228
[^] QNAP TS-128
[Mobile NAS] TBS-453DX w. 2x Crucial MX500 500gb EXT4 raid1

Network
Asus AC68U Router|100dl/50ul MBPS FTTH Internet | Win10, WC PC-Intel i7 920 Ivy bridge desktop (1x 512gb Samsung 850 Pro SSD + 1x 4tb HGST Ultrastar 7K4000)


Guides & articles
[Review] Moogle's QNAP experience
[Review] Moogle's TS-877 review
https://www.patreon.com/mooglestiltzkin

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Re: The best NAS drives for 2018

Post by Moogle Stiltzkin » Thu May 10, 2018 1:00 pm


From Youtube.com
NAS
[Main Server] QNAP TS-877 w. 4tb [ 3x HGST Deskstar NAS (HDN724040ALE640) & 1x WD RED NAS ] EXT4 Raid5 & 2 x m.2 SATA Samsung 850 Evo raid1 +16gb ddr4 Crucial+ QWA-AC2600 wireless+QXP PCIE
[Backup] QNAP TS-653A w. 5x 2TB Samsung F3 (HD203WI) EXT4 Raid5
[Backup] QNAP TL-D400S 2x 4TB WD Red Nas (WD40EFRX) single disks.
[^] QNAP TS-659 Pro II
[^] QNAP TS-509 Pro w. 4x 1TB WD RE3 (WD1002FBYS) EXT4 Raid5
[^] QNAP TS-228
[^] QNAP TS-128
[Mobile NAS] TBS-453DX w. 2x Crucial MX500 500gb EXT4 raid1

Network
Asus AC68U Router|100dl/50ul MBPS FTTH Internet | Win10, WC PC-Intel i7 920 Ivy bridge desktop (1x 512gb Samsung 850 Pro SSD + 1x 4tb HGST Ultrastar 7K4000)


Guides & articles
[Review] Moogle's QNAP experience
[Review] Moogle's TS-877 review
https://www.patreon.com/mooglestiltzkin

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Re: The best NAS drives for 2018

Post by flymeaway » Fri May 11, 2018 5:49 am

Moogle Stiltzkin wrote:best suggestion so far :) hm... is that ebay?


No, I'd never buy drives on eBay. These were from a (reputable) discount supply house but were new in sealed bags and with zero hours.

Note that they are *not* 4K sector drives, only drawback.

PM me for details.
David

Model: TS-877 R5-1600 // QTS 4.3.4.0551
Disks: 6x4TB HGST HUS726040ALE610 (RAID 6; QNAP approved) // 1x480gb Sandisk X400 SSD (no RAID; not approved)
RAM: 8gb QNAP OEM; 16gb Ballistix Sport DDR4 2400 MHz
GPU: EVGA GTX 1050 SC Gaming
UPS: CyberPower AVR1350
Cloud Backup: TBD

a13antichrist
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Re: The best NAS drives for 2018

Post by a13antichrist » Fri May 11, 2018 6:18 am

Moogle Stiltzkin wrote:<snip>


Moogle, off-topic, but can I ask you something - you seem to have amassed a significant number of QNAP devices. Can you tell me why you have repeatedly chosen the appliance route, and haven't found a home-built multi-array server box to be more appropriate for some of your needs? Not a criticism by any stretch, I am trying to learn about the use-cases for various situations. :)

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Re: The best NAS drives for 2018

Post by Moogle Stiltzkin » Fri May 11, 2018 12:05 pm

flymeaway wrote:No, I'd never buy drives on eBay. These were from a (reputable) discount supply house but were new in sealed bags and with zero hours.

Note that they are *not* 4K sector drives, only drawback.

PM me for details.


well i did successfully buy of ebay before, but there some caveats. warranty being problematic when sourcing from overseas.... but never had issue with the drives i bought. need to check the buyer comments, also make sure that the item is factory sealed and not repackaged.

also we don't have pm unfortunately :(

*oo wait not 4k? aww man :( that explains.


a13antichrist wrote:*wave :wink:


hi. yes over the years i've tried a number of models from low, to mid to high end. but that said i don't use all of them at once..... i merely just listed my collection over time.

Right the only ones i use are...

ts-877 (this is my main nas. i leave it on 24/7 for access to media. Sure i could setup sleep mode and save electricity, but still i never managed to got that feature working properly. also i'm a bit wary of too much spin ups and downs for hdd wear/tear :S )

653a (this is my main backup, since it's my 2nd most recent model)

659 pro II ( i don't use this because there is something wrong with 1 of the hdd bays. i might have accidentally damaged it when i forcibly inserted a hdd. the other bays seem to be fine, but it's hard to trust it if the motherboard may be damaged.)

509 pro - (this is my first nas. I'm still using it as backup. reason why i am still using this instead of only relying on 653a, because i have very old hard drives. rather than mix and match them in the same nas, i keep them separate. so instead in hybrid backup sync, i set backup to 2 different NAS for different shares. this seems to work fine for me. Even if 1 NAS backup goes capoot, at least the other half of my shares backup might be fine. But normally speaking, 1 NAS backup is better than 2, price wise)

ts-128 and ts-228 not using these. but if i had to i'd treat them as cheap fileservers to pop in any spare hdds i got lying around. Also they are my only arm cpu models.


anyway i probably should have sold my oudated NAS, and spares but i've a bad habit of hoarding :shock:


i also hoarde a collection of vintage mechanical keyboards as a hobby as well :mrgreen: which i helped found the largest mech keyboard club in Malaysia
https://forum.lowyat.net/topic/1610986



Anyway using my experience starting out at a ts-509.... when i upgraded to newer model, then the newer model is main, and old is relegated to backup.

now i got main NAS and a backup. and if you do the same again, you can then and sell your NAS as second hand. most people only need 2 NAS (3 if you doing offsite backup as well for 1-2-3 backup strat)

I did try cloud backup crashplan before, but my internet speed was horrible, and it was gonna take months for the first backup to be created ..... so i skipped that and just opted to refresh my NAS which was already a couple of years old and going EOL anyway.

Now i can do local lan backups with speeds of 110-120 on my newer models, and about 50-60 ish on the older model which is the bottleneck. for me this was just far too convenient.

downside is having to self maintain myself (not hard but the responsibility is all yours), and having to have enough hdds for 2 nas instead of 1 :(

anyway even when i'm using 3 NAS models, only 1 is 24/7 on. the other 2 are left powered off when i'm not doing any backups. electricity cost is too much running all 3 same time. some people may opt for doing scheduled automated backups, but i prefer to do mine manually.
NAS
[Main Server] QNAP TS-877 w. 4tb [ 3x HGST Deskstar NAS (HDN724040ALE640) & 1x WD RED NAS ] EXT4 Raid5 & 2 x m.2 SATA Samsung 850 Evo raid1 +16gb ddr4 Crucial+ QWA-AC2600 wireless+QXP PCIE
[Backup] QNAP TS-653A w. 5x 2TB Samsung F3 (HD203WI) EXT4 Raid5
[Backup] QNAP TL-D400S 2x 4TB WD Red Nas (WD40EFRX) single disks.
[^] QNAP TS-659 Pro II
[^] QNAP TS-509 Pro w. 4x 1TB WD RE3 (WD1002FBYS) EXT4 Raid5
[^] QNAP TS-228
[^] QNAP TS-128
[Mobile NAS] TBS-453DX w. 2x Crucial MX500 500gb EXT4 raid1

Network
Asus AC68U Router|100dl/50ul MBPS FTTH Internet | Win10, WC PC-Intel i7 920 Ivy bridge desktop (1x 512gb Samsung 850 Pro SSD + 1x 4tb HGST Ultrastar 7K4000)


Guides & articles
[Review] Moogle's QNAP experience
[Review] Moogle's TS-877 review
https://www.patreon.com/mooglestiltzkin

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Re: The best NAS drives for 2018

Post by Moogle Stiltzkin » Fri May 11, 2018 1:07 pm

a13antichrist wrote:...


also there different types of nas models.

- different bays 2,4,6 ....or more....

- high powered cpu.... low cpu cpu...

- ssd, m.2 ssd options....


either you have a low powered NAS for file server *just stores stuff for access. Or get a higher powered nas for doing all sorts of stuff, running many apps same time, run vm/docker....., plex transcoding......

cheapest raid5 file server i saw was a ts-328. based on the performance review, it seems to meet what i would require at bare minimum
https://nascompares.com/2018/04/11/unbo ... -for-2018/

unfortunately it's only 3 bays, and cpu is not something that can handle plex that well.


step up then is either a ts-x53be or a ts-x73
https://nascompares.com/2018/04/18/unbo ... -for-2018/

https://nascompares.com/2018/03/16/new- ... -nas-2018/


there is also a new series of models targeting 10gbe networking, with different cpu options

From Youtube.com




x77 series which is what i use can do pretty much anything cept thunderbolt.
https://nascompares.com/2017/12/07/unbo ... ever-seen/


TVS-1282T3 if you require thunderbolt3. most mac users prefer these.


TS-1677X is basically more bays than the x77


so decide if you want a low powered fileserver or a media high powered cpu nas (plex, transcoding...).... then how many bays needed.... do you need thunder bolt? 10gbe? ssd? and your budget. then get the one that fits all the criteria as your NAS :) Your backup doesn't need to be so high end, as a fileserver type would be sufficient.


Anyway go here and use the compare to find out what is best for you :) *though i'd recommend the more recent models
https://www.qnap.com/en-us/product/
NAS
[Main Server] QNAP TS-877 w. 4tb [ 3x HGST Deskstar NAS (HDN724040ALE640) & 1x WD RED NAS ] EXT4 Raid5 & 2 x m.2 SATA Samsung 850 Evo raid1 +16gb ddr4 Crucial+ QWA-AC2600 wireless+QXP PCIE
[Backup] QNAP TS-653A w. 5x 2TB Samsung F3 (HD203WI) EXT4 Raid5
[Backup] QNAP TL-D400S 2x 4TB WD Red Nas (WD40EFRX) single disks.
[^] QNAP TS-659 Pro II
[^] QNAP TS-509 Pro w. 4x 1TB WD RE3 (WD1002FBYS) EXT4 Raid5
[^] QNAP TS-228
[^] QNAP TS-128
[Mobile NAS] TBS-453DX w. 2x Crucial MX500 500gb EXT4 raid1

Network
Asus AC68U Router|100dl/50ul MBPS FTTH Internet | Win10, WC PC-Intel i7 920 Ivy bridge desktop (1x 512gb Samsung 850 Pro SSD + 1x 4tb HGST Ultrastar 7K4000)


Guides & articles
[Review] Moogle's QNAP experience
[Review] Moogle's TS-877 review
https://www.patreon.com/mooglestiltzkin

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Re: The best NAS drives for 2018

Post by P3R » Fri May 11, 2018 5:16 pm

Moogle Stiltzkin wrote:also i'd avoid any HDD not using the newer 4k sector tech which gave us more usable space.
No it doesn't. A 4 TB disk give you 4 TB, a 6 TB give you 6 TB and so on regardless of sector size used.
RAID have never ever been a replacement for backups. Without backups on a different system (preferably placed at another site), you will eventually lose data!

A non-RAID configuration (including RAID 0, which isn't really RAID) with a backup on a separate media protects your data far better than any RAID-volume without backup.

All data storage consists of both the primary storage and the backups. It's your money and your data, spend the storage budget wisely or pay with your data!

dolbyman
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Re: The best NAS drives for 2018

Post by dolbyman » Fri May 11, 2018 10:48 pm

well there could be a size difference, e.g. if you had lots of 5kb files on 4kb sectors (each file would sit on two sectors effectively, slashing the capacity in half) .. but with the usage of raid on top of those drives, this shouldn't be too much of an issue

oh... and the ecc for 4k sectors uses less space than for 512b sectors....so you gain space here

P3R
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Re: The best NAS drives for 2018

Post by P3R » Fri May 11, 2018 11:56 pm

dolbyman wrote:oh... and the ecc for 4k sectors uses less space than for 512b sectors..
Yes and that make it easier for manufacturers to create really large disks. For the user it doesn't really matter.
..so you gain space here
Come on, unless an 8 TB disk offer more than 8 TB, you as a user have not gained any space at all.

You need to come up with better arguments to make avoiding 512 Byte disks a wise recommendation.
RAID have never ever been a replacement for backups. Without backups on a different system (preferably placed at another site), you will eventually lose data!

A non-RAID configuration (including RAID 0, which isn't really RAID) with a backup on a separate media protects your data far better than any RAID-volume without backup.

All data storage consists of both the primary storage and the backups. It's your money and your data, spend the storage budget wisely or pay with your data!

a13antichrist
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Re: The best NAS drives for 2018

Post by a13antichrist » Fri May 11, 2018 11:56 pm

Moogle Stiltzkin wrote:<still prefer snips, don't ask me why :p >


Ahh ok. Personally I would sell the old ones and once I got past two devices lying around with multiple drives in each, I'd be looking at building a static host server to take all the run-offs, keep my primary NAS with the apps etc and one backup. Depending on how they come & go of course it can well be more practical to accumulate individual devices. I'm not a big fan of dropping near 1k for an appliance so I'm constantly running comparisons for FreeNAS against QNAP, although the effortlessness sure does have its draw. ;)
I think long-term, my thinking is a 10- or 16-bay home-built server that can simply absorb all older/hang-about drives, and a single high-perf ready-made NAS like QNAP as the primary operator. I'm not a linux/BSD expert but I know how to build stuff so I wouldn't want to be playing around too much with the functions inside it, but as an all-encompassing storage unit for secondary functions I can see the benefit. Probably easily financed by the sale of 3 or 4 older QNAP boxes, heh. Then again I come from an IT engineer background and get specific satisfaction from hardware in general, so buying something pre-built always comes with a tiny bit of spiritual conflict, haha.

P3R wrote:
dolbyman wrote:oh... and the ecc for 4k sectors uses less space than for 512b sectors..
Yes and that make it easier for manufacturers to create really large disks. For the user it doesn't really matter.
..so you gain space here
Come on, unless an 8 TB disk offer more than 8 TB, you as a user have not gained any space at all.

You need to come up with better arguments to make avoiding 512 Byte disks a wise recommendation.


Can you even buy 512k sector drives anymore? I thought there was a "mandate" of some kind that specified all drives produced after a certain date had to be 4K-sector or 4K-sector-emulated (512EE). But to be clear, 4K sectors is a matter of architectural efficiency. That and the 2Tb partition limit, and 2Gb file size limit.
Last edited by a13antichrist on Sat May 12, 2018 8:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.

dolbyman
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Re: The best NAS drives for 2018

Post by dolbyman » Sat May 12, 2018 12:10 am

P3R wrote:
dolbyman wrote:..so you gain space here
Come on, unless an 8 TB disk offer more than 8 TB, you as a user have not gained any space at all.

You need to come up with better arguments to make avoiding 512 Byte disks a wise recommendation.


I meant you gain space in contrast to the 512b ECC, obviously not overall more space than the advertised 8TB :mrgreen:

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